Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘LTV’

Screening of 'O le ku' at LTV. Photo © 2011 Bic Leu

In honor of Valentine’s Day, Tunde Kelani screened his romantic classic, O le ku (1997), for eager audiences on Saturday and Sunday at the LTV Station in Ikeja. Based on the popular 1974 novel by Prof. Akinwumi Isola, the film follows University of Ibadan student Ajani as he attempts to choose among three love interests: Asaka, Lola, and Sade.

Audience members were encouraged to dress “old school” to pay tribute to the film’s setting in the 1970’s.

Read Full Post »

Tunde Kelani directs the part of a LTV reporter

Today, we reconnected with Tunde Kelani’s roots in television when shooting moved to the LTV (Lagos Television) headquarters in Ikeja to film scenes of Kashimawo’s interview. Working on bond for NTV (Nigerian Television) in 1976 allowed Kelani to complete his certificate in filmmaking at London Film School. His early career in broadcasting cemented professional bonds, some of which have lasted for more than 30 years.

Crew-to-cast transformations: Joy Akalu (Wardrobe) , Dare Obadeyi (Spark), and Becky Olorunpomi (Continuity) as television technicians

Crew-to-cast transformations: Joy Akalu (Wardrobe) , Dare Obadeyi (Spark), and Becky Olorunpomi (Continuity) as television technicians

Outside his cinema work, Kelani also independently develops programming for television. His latest project for the small screen was Arambada (Yoruba for “Things that I would have loved to do”), a talk show that aired on LTV on Sunday afternoons in 2000–2002.

The afternoon was spent reshooting the scene of Kashimawo in the make-up chair (the very first scene shot in Lagos) after Bukky Ogunnote had to transfer the role of Dolapo to Tamilore Kuboye as a result of a scheduling conflict.

Titi Ogundipe (as Make-up Artist) and Wole Ojo (as Kashimawo)

Read Full Post »

Tunde Kelani returns behind the camera

When Sarafa  Abagun (Cameraman) fell ill from malaria this morning, Tunde Kelani immediately assumed his position behind the camera. Kelani attributes the ease of the transition to “resuming my primary skills,” referring to his professional film-making training at London International Film School in the 1970s and to his work as a cinematographer for many Nigerian celluloid films in the 1980s.

Tunde Kelani returns behind the camera

Kelani’s seamless double-duty as Director and Cinematographer has kept the production on track.  We have already completed two scenes this morning out of the twelve scenes that are scheduled for today. As we work late into the night, I will post live updates of our progress from our location in the Abeokuta GRA.

Funke Akindele (as Ma'ami) and Ayomide Abatti (as Young Kashimawo)

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: